Art Bilger writes about the future of employment for Knowledge@Wharton

1147

Knowledge@Wharton, the online business analysis journal of the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, published an in-depth article featuring WorkingNation and commentary from WorkingNation CEO Art Bilger.

The piece, titled “The Future of Work: How You Can Ride the Wave of Change”, investigates how automation, advances in technology, and other factors are impacting employment and the American workforce.

WorkingNation is profiled for its mission to counteract the challenge with scalable solutions and Bilger provides expert commentary on the issue.

From the article…

“A society poorly prepared for the future of work is precisely Art Bilger’s concern. The venture capitalist — he is a founding partner of Shelter Capital Partners — has founded an advocacy group called WorkingNation to create public awareness on the issue. With the national non-profit organization, Bilger is sounding the alarm bell on looming ‘mass structural unemployment’ in the U.S. as a result of technology, globalization, longevity and an educational system that has failed to keep pace. The group is producing and distributing content — short videos and documentaries — arguing that society must do more to prepare for change, and spotlighting examples of groups coming up with solutions.”

“As for where the responsibility lies for preparing the workforce for the future, Bilger says policy at a federal level can help, but the best solutions are to be found on a local level, with organizations like the ones he is highlighting — and with businesses. ‘I do think corporations can play a very significant role, and I think they have a real responsibility. Corporations have the greatest visibility as to how jobs are changing. If they can’t fill jobs, and that is a problem today, they have a real need in terms of day-to-day business. And they’ve got the greatest resources. When you look at the financial and human resources they could bring to the table, that could be very valuable.’ “

Read the full article at Knowledge@Wharton.

Facebook Comments